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SCIENCE

The animatronic attraction's crew had less than two days to turn the DECC's Pioneer Hall into a prehistoric playground.
Known as “forever chemicals” for their persistence in the environment, PFAS have been popular with manufacturers for decades and can be found in everything from nonstick cookware coating to fire-extinguishing foam. Higher levels of exposure to PFAS have been linked to increased cancer risk, developmental delays in children, damage to organs such as the liver and thyroid, increased cholesterol levels and reduced immune functions, especially among young children.
Ticket sales for the upcoming show have been so far beyond expectations that producers called the DECC to ask, "Are these numbers real?"
Based at the 148th Fighter Wing, the science education program now has space to serve more Northland kids.

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Jurassic Quest, an edutainment experience boasting "the nation's largest herd of photorealistic dinosaurs," will be at the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center July 1-3.
From the letter: "Access into wild areas ought to be cautiously developed. Moose love a good footpath but are slaughtered on highways. Helicopters veering overhead to count wildlife bolting from cover are a noxious intrusion."
UMD graduate and undergraduate students gave middle schoolers a lesson in brain development
Women need to be included in more drug studies to minimize the risks to females of medications.
We have the solution, literally, within arm’s length.
Identification of new strains through whole-genome sequencing is a process far more complex than the standard lab tests used to clinically diagnose a patient with COVID-19.

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The gut microbiome has been shown to play a role in ways that are both positive and negative in health. A team of researchers from Sanford Health and North Dakota State University will explore whether certain gut bacteria can trigger stress eating.
To do that, they need to bridge the gap between purely scientific researchers and clinical professionals. The SMHS has been emphasizing work in the area of translational research, which aims to “translate” scientific research into practical treatments. That work is being done through the Dakota Cancer Collaborative on Translational Activity (DaCCoTA), a clinical translational research center (CTR), that pairs in teams doctors and researchers.
Overall, we have a lot to celebrate and be proud of.

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