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Hunter Kvistad's farm in Yellow Medicine County is the site of a virtual tour on Nov. 22, 2022 –- two days before Thanksgiving -– as part of Minnesota Agriculture in the Classroom. Keri Sidle of Minnesota Agriculture in the Classroom said the organization has been visiting a turkey farm just before Thanksgiving every year since 2016. Minnesota is the nation's leading turkey producer and the turkey farm is the most popular of the virtual tours. Sidle expects more than 100 elementary classrooms from 12 to 15 states will participate.
The first two communities where Nature Energy will set up are Benson in central Minnesota and Wilson in the southeast. The company is working on plans for a third location in Roberts, Wisconsin, just across the St. Croix River from Minnesota.
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Kandi Acres of Hawick, Minnesota, is home to nearly 500 goats, most of them raised for meat production. Owned by Tiffany Farrier, it has been a labor of love. It is the only halal-certified goat farm in the state, meaning the goats are raised in a way acceptable to Islamic tenets.
"It was awesome to hear the thunder of their hooves on the ground," said David Wise. Before Monday, there were no buffalo within the reservation boundaries of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa.
Multiple colleges in North Dakota and Minnesota are starting up meat cutting programs to try to help meet a demand for workers. Some of the first North Dakota State College of Science students are interning with a small-town meat locker as part of that program.
Goats On The Go affiliates throughout the U.S. use goats to control nuisance and invasive vegetation on residential and public properties.

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For 14 years, NDSU Extension and the North Dakota Lamb and Wool Association have teamed up to help North Dakota youth get more involved within the sheep industry.
North Dakota’s wide-open spaces are attractive to hog producers in states such as Indiana and Iowa who are trying to improve biosecurity by spreading out barns. Soybean crush plants will soon be adding even more feed to the local supply, and manure is increasing in popularity as an alternative to commercial fertilizer.
People in the livestock industry offer multiple reasons why North Dakota has fallen behind, with anti-corporate farming laws, a lack of ag processing, restrictive ordinances and the 'stigma' of livestock among them.

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