We see that you have javascript disabled. Please enable javascript and refresh the page to continue reading local news. If you feel you have received this message in error, please contact the customer support team at 1-833-248-7801.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

FLOODING

Latest Headlines
"One of the old things we used to say is the lake is not a bathtub, it doesn't just lay at one level," said Pete Boulay, a climatologist with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. "What I always point out, when people complain that (water levels) have never been this low, just go back farther and you'll find lower water than you have right now."
Rivers across the region were expected to crest on Friday and throughout the weekend, while a risk of more dangerous flash flooding remained possible again throughout the day, the weather service said.
The move allows the state, tribal nations, local governments and some nonprofits to tap into federal funds.
Information will be used to consider possibilities for federal assistance and local property tax relief.
After peaking at a record high level in mid-June, the water has dropped nearly 2 feet. The National Weather Service predicts the lake will drop by nearly another foot by Friday, July 15.
St. Louis County's flood response is moving into “recovery mode."

ADVERTISEMENT

With the potential for more heavy rain Friday night, the mayor said emergency personnel were in the process of recommending others in the city to consider leaving their at-risk homes. The sheriff’s office also advised those who’ve left their homes to avoid returning to them until it is safe to do so, and the public was also asked to stay away from the Randall area so emergency personnel could do their jobs effectively.
Earlier this month the flooding broke the lake's all-time record set in 1950, and it's only come down a few inches since.
The forecast calls for a mostly dry period as waterfront properties remain flooded.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT