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FARM FINANCES

University of Minnesota Extension is offering three free family retreat weekends in 2023 to help guide the farm transition discussion.
In inflation-adjusted 2022 dollars, net farm income would be at its highest level since 1973 and net cash farm income at its highest level on record, according to the USDA.
Last winter's uncertainly on fertilizer inputs has subsided somewhat. Flexible or not, any lease is likely to reflect the strong prices for commodities and the demand for cropland.
Brian Bjork, 62, (pronounced “Byork”) a farmer from Forman, North Dakota, is selling his machinery piecemeal after making the decision in December 2021 to retire from farming. His reasoning: used equipment values are “hot” and unlikely to improve. He’ll enjoy retirement near family and will work for a young neighbor who will rent his land.

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Latest Headlines
America's diverse family farms remain the backbone of U.S. agriculture, according to a report from the USDA. But those farms continue to come in many shapes and sizes.
2020 was a memorable year for U.S. agriculture, marked by the pandemic, increased federal aid and more exports to China, according to the chief economist of the American Farm Bureau Federation.
While there are many important economic factors for cattle producers to consider, getting their calves to their weaning date is an important one.
U.S. farm income will rise sharply in what's been a challenging year for American agriculturalists, according to a new U.S. Department of Agriculture forecast. Federal payments are primarily responsible.
Federal farm subsidies, always controversial, have been especially important to farmers this year. But some of the payments aren't sustainable.
According to the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis’ third-quarter agricultural credit conditions survey, increasing farm commodity prices and COVID-related government programs have put farmers in a pretty good spot financially.

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American farmers are making greater use of futures, options and marketing contracts to manage risk, the U.S. Department of Agriculture says. Corn and soybeans are most likely to be involved.
Hiram Drache, professor emeritus of history at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn., died Oct. 17, 2020, at age 96. Drache had a regional and national impact for his authorship of agricultural history books. He was a controversial advocate of larger-scale corporate-style farming business, including that of his former student Ron D. Offutt Jr., of Fargo, who became a world titan of potato production and farm equipment retailing.
A farm and ranch software company executive impressed the company owner when she called for her own farm's tech call and hired her on the spot.

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