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CLEAN ENERGY

From the column: "Our local transition to renewable power is well underway."
Today, the Prairie Island Community is seeking to disentangle itself from a power plant it never wanted. It’s created a $46 million plan to produce net zero carbon emissions within the next decade.
The transmission line is aimed at bolstering grid reliability as renewable energy replaces traditional coal-fired plants. It was one of 18 projects approved by the region's grid operator Monday.
If approved, typical residential consumers would see an electrical rate increase of $180 a year; and $660 more a year for small businesses.

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From the column: "We are particularly sensitive to the impacts on our customers of any request to raise rates. As evidence of this sensitivity, this request was just our fourth in 25 years."
From the column: "We need a new deck, one stacked in favor of survival and abundance, where we all become the house and deal a fair game for us all."
Duluth's Climate Action Work Plan earns recognition.
From the column: "The combination of a holiday from the gas tax and a windfall profits tax on the oil companies could help."
From the column: "This will take time, but I do believe it is possible with the help of voices in our region and in communities around the country. We need to start working now, with big and small steps, to move in this direction."
The Biden administration seems to be intentionally jacking up gas prices with half the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska now off the table for oil drilling and the Offshore Drilling Plan for Alaska’s Cook Inlet now canceled.

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The EPA is likely to raise ethanol blending mandates for 2021 above a figure it proposed in December to align with actual U.S. consumption levels.
The commitment, published at the end of three days of talks, was weaker than a previous draft of the final communique seen by Reuters, which had included a target to end unabated coal power generation by 2030. Sources familiar with the discussions said Japan and the United States had both indicated they could not support that date.
Climatologist Mark Seeley said at many Minnesota climate stations, the first four months of the year had daily wind gusts of 30 miles per hour or more on 60% of days.

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