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CRAFT BEER

At the start of each New Year, I do some thinking about what’s coming next in the beer world. I do this to stay ahead on trends, mull over new ideas I like, and plan what I want to focus on.
We are lucky and fortunate to live here and enjoy the hard work of the women and men that show up every day. There has never been a better time to enjoy very high-level crafted offerings than now.
The last 15 years have supported brewery growth not seen since post-prohibition. ... It was a banner time for us and the beer-drinking public.
Over the past eight years, Voyageur Brewing Co. has grown into a regular happy hour gathering spot for tourists and locals. The owners recently purchased an adjacent building to expand operations and explore barrel-aging production.

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This week, as we head into fall and inevitably winter, I’m going to touch on some classic and newer beer styles that I’ve been a fan of and a brewer of over the years.
Key supplies are increasing in price and decreasing in supply putting pressure on an industry still recovering from COVID-19 closures.
The landscape of the brewing industry has changed and evolved very quickly in the last 10 years: new beers, new trends and a much more educated beer drinking patron.
A Minnesota state warning has some retailers and producers taking a wait and see on THC-infused brews.
The 10th Minnesota Craft Brewers Guild festival sold about 4,500 tickets and had more than 100 Minnesota breweries and brew pubs in attendance.
The best festivals are organized and easy to navigate with great food, musical entertainment and educational components that are interactive.

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Those of us who live this dream know that one of the biggest secrets to a happy life is loving your job.
The popular downtown Duluth brewery can now produce, and serve, twice as much beer. Oh, and there's also more room for ax throwing.
It’s a significant development for the state’s growing craft brewing and distilling industries, which have been pushing for years to expand what they can sell directly from their operations. Distilleries want to be able to sell larger bottles, and the state’s biggest craft breweries have wanted fewer restrictions on the sale of growlers, the large glass bottles typically used to carry draft beer poured from taphouses.

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