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The information gathered will be used to further develop high-speed internet acess for Minnesotans.
Money to subsidize rural broadband initiatives has been limited, but recently the Minnesota Legislature approved $70 million for high-speed internet and the U.S. Senate passed an infrastructure package this week that would give the state at least $100 million for broadband upgrades. The infrastructure bill is now moving onto the House.
Councilors joined forces with Duluth's mayor in an effort to bring more competition to the city's internet service market.
Midco fiber-optic broadband will serve communities in northern Minnesota, including Ely and International Falls.

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After seeing firsthand how rural parts of the county lag behind when it comes to internet service, St. Louis County commissioners said this week they would help foster expansion.
From the column: "Even though social-media toxins are here to stay, it remains possible to distinguish facts from lies, if every citizen would exercise a little caution."
Approximately $20 million in grant funding was set aside for both the 2020 and 2021 rounds of the program by the Minnesota Legislature in 2019 amid a larger state government effort to make high-speed internet more widely accessible.
A letter on Oct. 27 asked, “ How can anyone, man or woman, support former Vice President Joe Biden?” The letter urged readers to do a simple Google search for “Biden the pervert.”
More Duluthians and Minnesotans are working from home, safely distanced against the spread of the coronavirus. In the days ahead, thousands of students will return to classes — by logging on from home.
Like many things in 2020, back-to-school preparations look different this fall with many schools choosing to start the school year virtually. As a result, the most-needed school supply may be internet connectivity.

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While the circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 outbreak are indescribably tragic, the adaptive capacity of our society found new ways to deliver goods, services, and other necessities through the use of digital platforms and tools. In particular, the challenges of distance learning opened up new opportunities to imagine how to deliver education online to students and parents physically cut off from their schools.
Every crisis brings fringe players out of the woodwork, and COVID-19 has been no different. The flat-earthers insist we can open immediately and ignore the certain rebound of the virus. The doomsayers tell us we should be in a bunker for the next two years. The trick for policymakers is to separate the signal from the noise and follow the facts.
The coronavirus crisis is a stark reminder of the grave costs of infrastructure neglect — in this case the neglect of our public health infrastructure.

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