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Photo gallery: A closer look at garden flowers

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A ruby-throated hummingbird feeds at an orange honeysuckle. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)


In the right seasons, flower gardens are a thing of beauty. It would be a mistake, however, just to stand back when admiring them. Get close. Look at the detail of a single bloom or leaf. Watch some of the small birds and insects that rely on nectar and pollen from flowers. You’ll come away with a greater appreciation for gardens.

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A monarch butterfly feeds at a purple coneflower. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)

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With its speckled flower petals curving backward and style and stamens projecting down, a tiger lily presents a stately presence. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)

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Pollen coats and fills the pollen sacs of a bee visiting a globe thistle. Many bees lack pollen sacs on their rear legs, collecting and transporting pollen solo on their hairy bodies. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)

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The sun shines through the foliage of a canna lily, making each vein stick out. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)

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The petals on a bee balm form a fireworks-like burst of color around a central disk. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)

Related Topics: PHOTO GALLERIESGARDENING
Steve Kuchera is a retired Duluth News Tribune photographer.
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