ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Ask a conservation officer: Stop fishing after keeping limit

Q: If I have caught and kept my limit of a certain species of fish, is it legal for me to keep fishing for that species as long as I practice catch-and-release?A: Once you have caught and reduced to possession (kept) your legal limit of fish, you...

Q: If I have caught and kept my limit of a certain species of fish, is it legal for me to keep fishing for that species as long as I practice catch-and-release?
A: Once you have caught and reduced to possession (kept) your legal limit of fish, you may not attempt to take any more fish of that species. Doing so would be attempting to take more than a limit. Releasing some fish instead of putting them in your pail or livewell, and staying below your limit, will enable you to continue to fish. Similarly, if a season is closed for a particular species of fish, an angler may not attempt to take (to keep or catch-and-release) that species of fish unless there is a designated “Catch-and-Release” season for that species.

Matthew S. Miller is a Minnesota Conservation Officer with the Lake Superior Marine Unit.Send your questions to outdoors@duluthnews.com .

Related Topics: FISHING
What To Read Next
Hull was a five-time 50-goal scorer, led the NHL in goalscoring seven times, twice won the Hart Trophy and was voted a First-Team All-Star on the left wing 10 times.
Peterson’s unassisted goal lifts Springfield to the NAHL home win.
Ice cross racers are competing in three divisions during multiple days of competition at Mont du Lac Resort in Superior as part of the U.S. Ice Cross Association's annual ATSX 250 event.
Thoreson’s third-period goal is the difference as Posch is tough in net for Minnesota.