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DEREK CHAUVIN

The three are charged with violating Floyd's civil rights during the arrest of the handcuffed Black man on a road outside a Minneapolis grocery store in May 2020, video of which sparked street protests against racism and police brutality around the world.
The U.S. District Court in Saint Paul announced the change-of-plea hearing on Monday, an indication Chauvin, 45, would change his plea to guilty.
After a potential juror in the Kimberly Potter trial was struck after she said she did not understand English well enough to follow the case, some observers wondered why the court didn’t offer interpreters for jurors. Worse, some wondered if language was being used as a proxy for race.
A Hennepin County jury convicted Chauvin on April 20 of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for killing Floyd after kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes during an arrest in May 2020. He was sentenced to 22½ years in prison.

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Chauvin's appeal to the Minnesota Court of Appeals came 90 days after his June 25 sentencing on the last day he could have done so, according to court documents. He was convicted of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.
The department is adopting a training program called Active Bystandership for Law Enforcement. It taps research and training in other fields, including surgery and aviation, to teach people how to step in when their colleague — even a senior colleague — is likely to cause harm.
The charges, which run separate from the state's cases against the same officers, allege Derek Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao used the "color of the law" to deprive George Floyd of his constitutional rights to be "free from the use of unreasonable force" when Chauvin pinned Floyd down with a knee on his neck for more than 9 minutes, and the other three did nothing to stop him.
Journee Howard, 25, believes she was chosen as a juror because she made it clear she had a neutral mindset. Though no one is completely unbiased, neutral and down the middle, Howard said, she is open-minded and doesn't lean far one way or the other politically.
In Cahill’s decision Tuesday, July 13, he said that the state hadn’t proven that the girls had experienced trauma in their arguments for the aggravating factor, and that prosecutors also didn’t take the opportunity to request a separate hearing on the issue before sentencing.
The former Minneapolis Police officer was convicted of murder in April, a year after he kneeled on George Floyd's neck May 25, 2020, killing him outside a south Minneapolis convenience store. The incident, caught on video by a bystander, galvanized the U.S. police reform movement and set off a wave of protests.

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The former Minneapolis Police officer was convicted of murder in April, a year after he kneeled on George Floyd's neck May 25, 2020, killing him outside a south Minneapolis convenience store. The incident, caught on video by a bystander, galvanized the U.S. police reform movement and set off a wave of protests.
The eight-figure penalty represents a common gap in criminal sentencing throughout America's federal court system: The restitution bill far exceeds the defendants' financial means. Those convicted of the crime pay incremental sums, and the money never comes close to meeting restitution's purpose of returning victims back to their status quo. In reality, the U.S. Department of Justice recovers only $1 out of every $10 owed per year, making restitution sometimes symbolic or a mere formality in a criminal sentence, according to a report from the Congressional Research Service.
Derek Chauvin was sentenced Friday, June 25, for the murder of George Floyd. Watch a stream here.

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