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Reader's view: Un-Fair Campaign offers much to resent, reverse racism

I have held my peace on the Un-Fair Campaign thus far. But the Feb. 16 letter, "Awareness of racism is an admirable goal," prompted me to write. I do not consider myself a racist, but I resent the inference I am, simply because I am white, by the...

I have held my peace on the Un-Fair Campaign thus far. But the Feb. 16 letter, "Awareness of racism is an admirable goal," prompted me to write.

I do not consider myself a racist, but I resent the inference I am, simply because I am white, by the Un-Fair Campaign. My wife, by the way, is a registered Native American.

I resent the implication of white privilege. My kids did not have the privilege of affirmative action to get into a given university, especially an elite one. I resent I never had had the privilege of being hired to meet an affirmative-action quota. I suspect I was turned down for a position because a member of a racial minority got the job to meet some quota or to make the company feel good. I resent that.

The letter writer defined racism as a construct to oppress another group and to create privileges for the oppressing group. By that definition, much of the contemporary, civil-rights movement would be racist because it continually seeks privileges not afforded to others through affirmative-action hiring and college-enrollment quotas. I resent that.

Implied throughout this campaign is that black people live in poverty and are underprivileged because they are the victims of racism and oppression. But no one dares talk about the approximately 70 percent of black children born out of wedlock. That in and of itself pretty much consigns children to poverty. And it has nothing to do with white privilege or oppression. It is an uncomfortable fact of life, but it is a fact.

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I therefore resent the holier-than-thou attitude of the Un-fair Campaign. It is misguided at best and reverse racism at worst.

David Smith

Duluth

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