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Reader's view: There's no need to apologize for America's good deeds

Much of our national news media seem to dwell on what's wrong in our exceptional nation, along with injurious, hateful and harmful conduct by some of our people, including those who murder and maim.

Much of our national news media seem to dwell on what's wrong in our exceptional nation, along with injurious, hateful and harmful conduct by some of our people, including those who murder and maim.

There is a growing lack of respect for various religions practiced in our United States of America. This applies especially to Christianity, so woven into the fabric of the founding and development of a capitalist republic of 50 states and carried into areas of the world to bring people hope and freedom.

We want and need our political leaders, especially the one in the White House, to be proud and not apologetic for what amounts to American good deeds throughout the world, as has often been expressed in my writings.

The amount of volunteering and citizen response to the wide variety of individual and community needs and problems continues to amaze me. This is reflected in the multitude of programs and organizations doing just that in our Duluth area and, importantly, the good being done by our daily and weekly newspapers, our magazines and television and radio stations.

What weighs on us rather heavily is what takes place in Washington, D.C., as we face presidential and congressional elections in 2012. There is much political maneuvering by individuals now in power and those who aim to replace them. In the interim, the U.S. debt continues to grow beyond belief, even as we hope and demand solutions and controls of what affects us at home, in the working place and in society in general.

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We look to those in the White House and in Congress and those who seek to and may replace them to provide necessary leadership to bring about responsible change to the private sector for badly needed growth in jobs.

Art Barschdorf

Hermantown

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