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Reader's View: The Bible provides ancient star records

The following statement from the Feb. 6 story, "Seeing night sky the American Indian way," was enlightening: "Our ancestors looked to nature near and far not only for instruction but to imbue life with meaning and purpose."...

The following statement from the Feb. 6 story, "Seeing night sky the American Indian way," was enlightening: "Our ancestors looked to nature near and far not only for instruction but to imbue life with meaning and purpose."

Wouldn't it be gratifying if a person had direct access to ancient star records?

Many of us, more than likely, have some copies of ancient star records in our homes. The oldest star records in existence are recorded in your family's Bible. Two of the star chambers depicted in the Skidi Pawnee Indian's 400-year-old star chart also are named in your Bible. The Bear (Big Dipper) and Pleiades are specifically named in the book of Job as follows: "He made the Bear, Orion, and the Pleiades and the chambers of the south."

Some of us probably would like to take a closer look at the star chart. Three stars above the word Antares on the chart appear to resemble the angle of the stars in Orion's belt. Like Astro Bob (the News Tribune's Bob King, who writes a blog under the same name) suggested, other star configurations are represented on the chart.

Having a copy of an ancestral record in your home like the Bible contains an inexhaustible resource. To encourage you to embrace some of God's glory, the skyscape from Job is visible in the west during late February and early March. This skyscape is one of nature's treasures to enjoy, if you're able to make time to view it.

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Tim Riley

Duluth

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