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Reader's view: Term limits supporter's bias against Ness appears obvious

While I appreciated the sentiment in the July 3 editorial that politicians should be changed out every so often (Our View: "Term limits idea worth debating"), it was hard to overlook the obvious bias of Charter Commission member Eli Miletich, who...

While I appreciated the sentiment in the July 3 editorial that politicians should be changed out every so often (Our View: "Term limits idea worth debating"), it was hard to overlook the obvious bias of Charter Commission member Eli Miletich, who's proposing term limits in Duluth. His claim of non-bias coupled with his insulting the person his suggested change would affect did not lend credence to his argument. I suggest Miletich refrain from his current rhetoric if he wishes to be taken seriously.

Furthermore, either Miletich is not well-educated about the Constitution of the United States or he is being deliberately ignorant. The Founding Fathers, or Framers of the Constitution, never had any intent to impose term limits on politicians. The 22nd Amendment was ratified in 1951, officially imposing term limits. Prior to that time it was an informal precedent but not a legal requirement.

The city of Duluth has done a fantastic job on its own in the rotation of politicians when it has felt such changes were necessary. Until such time this system is broken, there is no immediate need to change it. Further complicating our political system in this city would not necessarily add positive results. If a presiding governor is doing his or her job to the satisfaction of the people, there is no need to replace him or her just because of a need for change.

Nick Lovold

Duluth

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