ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Reader's View: Story on POTS contained some errors

As a person living with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, or POTS, I appreciated the Feb. 15 article, "Fatigue mystery solved," which was about four Denfeld students with POTS.However, the article contained two statements I found to be i...

As a person living with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, or POTS, I appreciated the Feb. 15 article, “Fatigue mystery solved,” which was about four Denfeld students with POTS.
However, the article contained two statements I found to be in error.
One was that most teens with POTS fully recover. According to Dr. Svetlana Blishteyn, a leading dysautonomia specialist, there is absolutely no evidence to support this. According to Dysautonomia International, most teens do not outgrow POTS, although many will see an improvement in their condition (dysauto
nomiainternational.org/page.php?ID=180).
The other statement I found to be in error was that exercise must be “vertical,” thus swimming doesn’t count. In fact, swimming is one of the most common forms of exercise recommended to people with POTS. Recumbent biking is another common type of exercise recommended to POTS patients. Dysautonomia International has listed exercise recommendations for people with POTS at dysautonomiainternational.org/page.php?ID=43.
POTS is a poorly understood condition, and publishing inaccurate statements can hinder awareness about this condition. Double-checking facts and using multiple resources to confirm facts is necessary when writing about any medical condition - and especially when writing about a medical condition that many doctors have never even heard of and thus do not understand.
I wish the four Denfeld students the best on their journeys.
Sarah Bivona
Duluth

What To Read Next