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Reader's view: Sept. 11 instilled anger, not fear, in America

Watching the victims' names being read during the Sept. 11 memorials, I was moved to respond to a commentary in the News Tribune the same day, titled "Muslims must dispel growing fear of Islam." The writer made many good points and appears to be ...

Watching the victims' names being read during the Sept. 11 memorials, I was moved to respond to a commentary in the News Tribune the same day, titled "Muslims must dispel growing fear of Islam." The writer made many good points and appears to be a man of peace. However, I disagreed with his use of the word "fear."

Seven months after Sept. 11, while touring a mosque in Singapore, I was approached and asked if America was fearful. It took me some time to understand the apparent intent of the question. Fear is the goal of terrorism, which is the systematic use of violence to control. The suggestion that Americans are fearful of Islam is not an accurate understanding of the American psyche, as I know it.

Watching the names being read during the memorial of Sept. 11, I was not fearful; I was angry. For good or bad I believe this is the way America reacts to being sucker-punched. Our heightened state of awareness with all its personal infringements is not fear; it is an offensive commitment to not being fooled again. The current troop commitments are projections of anger, not fear.

Anger does not lead to clear thinking, as can be seen by our country's war behavior over the past 10 years. But do not confuse our motives; it is not fear, it is anger.

It is my hope I may hear more from the Muslim community that will help me resolve my anger.

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James A. Holter

Duluth

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