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Reader's view: Preamble not representative of entire Constitution

After sending a letter earlier today (April 14) which expressed my confusion about a letter writer's claim in the April 14 issue ("Writers twisting Constitution's words"), I finally discovered that he must have been referring to the Preamble to t...

After sending a letter earlier today (April 14) which expressed my confusion about a letter writer's claim in the April 14 issue ("Writers twisting Constitution's words"), I finally discovered that he must have been referring to the Preamble to the Constitution, whereas my letters dealt mostly with Article One, Section Eight of the Constitution, which involves the powers granted to the government. The Preamble does indeed call on the government to "promote the general welfare." However, the Preamble is not the Constitution anymore than the Table of Contents in a text book includes all the knowledge students must learn. Article One, Section Eight, however, clearly gives the government the power to "provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States." I made quite certain I used the correct quote exactly.

I am unaware that any of my letters concerning government mandates applied in order to "provide for the common welfare" referred to the specific language of the Preamble. I also very clearly quoted Article One, Section Eight, which definitely uses the word "provide" to refer to the common defense and general welfare.

Apparently the writer of the April 14 letter did not read my letter very carefully, and so I failed to realize he was quoting the Preamble.

Peter W. Johnson

Superior

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