ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Reader's view: Lots of welfare foes get government help

Recently I found an interesting website, farm.ewg.org. It lists crop subsidies received by farmers and amounts paid by states and counties. Yes, farmers are hard-working, and none I know are lazy. However, in this era of record-high grain prices,...

Recently I found an interesting website, farm.ewg.org. It lists crop subsidies received by farmers and amounts paid by states and counties. Yes, farmers are hard-working, and none I know are lazy. However, in this era of record-high grain prices, subsidies for corn, soybeans, oats and sunflower seeds are not necessary, even according to agricultural experts. It's business as usual.

Many businesses along the way get "government help" or tax breaks of some kind, whether admitted or not. Unfortunately, those of us not positioned to inherit a farm, business or trust fund have to get wealth the old way, by working for it and saving.

If someone falls on hard times by losing a job and has to use social safety nets, there are others who are quick to shout, "Entitlements!" and, "Welfare!" They are quick to try to balance budgets on the backs of people who worked hard but now need a hand up.

I've heard with my own ears farmers (enriched by crop subsidies) complain about others using social safety nets to get through tough times. They should pay back their crop subsidies if that's how they feel.

There are other ways some of us use "entitlements."

ADVERTISEMENT

If you attended public college, you may have attended a "land grant college" established by Congress in 1862 from taxpayer money.

Pell grants are publicly funded.

If you ever had to go into a public hospital, nursing home or clinic, you probably used a facility established by the Hill-Burton Act of 1946, again with taxpayer money.

And if you are employed in the government sector, you should remind yourself that your salary, pension and benefits all are funded by taxpayers who work just as hard as you, but most for less money. You are public servants and should act that way.

Mark S. Roalson

Hoyt Lakes

What To Read Next