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Reader's view: Dog owners must keep pets from barking

I'm going to cut to the chase: People who let their dogs bark incessantly within the city limits ought not to be allowed to own dogs at all. It is not fair to the animal, and it certainly is not very considerate of the neighborhood.

I'm going to cut to the chase: People who let their dogs bark incessantly within the city limits ought not to be allowed to own dogs at all. It is not fair to the animal, and it certainly is not very considerate of the neighborhood.

There are days in my Chester Park neighborhood when I am literally surrounded by barking dogs. One barks because it cannot play with the kids. One barks because it is left tied up on the back deck while the owners are out of the house. One barks from the upstairs window because people have the chutzpah to walk by below. One barks because it is just a mean S.O.B. that has to broadcast his ferocity to the entire neighborhood. Two little ones bark because they are on a dog run outside early in the morning to do their business and they want to come back indoors. To top it all off, there are several dogs who ordinarily do not bark -- unless one or more other dogs are barking.

I like dogs. I have one of my own. I am lucky because he does not bark except on rare occasions and then just once or twice. He's lucky because I take him on walks, play ball with him and pay enough attention to him each day that he does not suffer from any anxiety that would result in loud, unrestrained, incessant barking.

While there are always extenuating circumstances, and while it is true that most family dogs are fortunate to have food in their stomachs, a roof over their heads and veterinary attention, none of that counts when sleep is interrupted, a twilight calm is disturbed, or the dog's own sense of belonging is threatened.

Phil Fitzpatrick

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Duluth

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