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Reader's View: Diabetics vulnerable to smoking

The writer of the May 1 letter, "Anti-smoking ads are hard to put a finger on," couldn't see how smoking and amputations were connected. I know of one connection, and that is diabetes.

The writer of the May 1 letter, "Anti-smoking ads are hard to put a finger on," couldn't see how smoking and amputations were connected. I know of one connection, and that is diabetes.

Thirty-eight years ago I quit smoking due to my irritation to the smell left on my clothing and in my hair. Thirty-seven years ago I was hospitalized and was told I was a Type 2 diabetic who would require insulin injections for the rest of my life. Knowing little about the illness, I sought out sources to educate myself.

I attended meetings where one of the first things stressed was that if you're a smoker, quit now; the reason was that our blood circulation helps with the healing process when we have a wound, whether big or small. Smoking interferes with the blood's correct circulation, thereby allowing infections to take hold and, in some cases, amputations to be necessary.

I am forever grateful for having quit smoking before being diagnosed. I am now 76 years old and have experienced other complications related to diabetes, such as vision loss, neuropathy, a weakness in muscle and bone -- but, so far, no amputations.

I have met a couple of diabetics who also were amputees, and they both were smokers; however, there also are diabetics who are amputees and who have never smoked.

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The point is smoking and secondhand smoke can interfere with our circulation process.

Jan Montgomery/b>

Duluth

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