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Reader's View: Dangerous to turn our backs on science

I was thrilled to join hundreds of others in the March for Science on Earth Day ("March for Science planned Saturday in Duluth," April 20). It was exhilarating to see so many Duluthians concerned about our environment and about the dangerous atti...

I was thrilled to join hundreds of others in the March for Science on Earth Day ("March for Science planned Saturday in Duluth," April 20). It was exhilarating to see so many Duluthians concerned about our environment and about the dangerous attitude that political ideology trumps science.

But when I looked in the News Tribune for coverage of the local event the next day, I found nothing. This was a disgrace.

Even the USA Today segment that covered the national march spent several paragraphs extolling President Donald Trump's call for "honest inquiry and rational debate." Oh, really? Can we expect honest inquiry from the same guy who tweeted that global warming is a hoax perpetrated by the Chinese?

What Trump doesn't seem to understand about scientific facts is they remain true even if you don't believe in them. Sea levels are not going to stop rising just because he disapproves. When his beloved Mar-a-Lago golf course is underwater, will he blame it on President Barack Obama?

Rejecting science will set our nation on a very dangerous path. Virtually all the modern amenities we take for granted had their origins in scientific inquiry. Transistors, integrated circuits, lasers, microwave ovens, and innumerable other technologies came from basic scientific research. Even the World Wide Web the president uses for his tweets was first developed to facilitate scientific communication. Your GPS tracking device would be useless if its calculations did not include corrections due to Einstein's theory of relativity.

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We cannot afford to forfeit our preeminence in science by going backwards. Our national security is at stake. The 20th century has been called the American century. If we allow the present administration's scorn for science to become the norm, we can be sure no one will say the same thing about the 21st.

James J. Amato

Duluth

Related Topics: SCIENCE
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