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Reader's view: Cravaack will bring dynamic economy to state

The Dec. 27 letter, "DNT should have better vetted Cravaack," was amusing in that it got important bits of information badly wrong, starting with the writer's suggestion that U.S. Rep.-elect Chip Cravaack opposes the Duluth International Airport ...

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The Dec. 27 letter, "DNT should have better vetted Cravaack," was amusing in that it got important bits of information badly wrong, starting with the writer's suggestion that U.S. Rep.-elect Chip Cravaack opposes the Duluth International Airport project ("Cravaack now on board with airport project," Dec. 18).

Cravaack explained why he supports building a new terminal at Duluth International to political reporters Tom Hauser, Esme Murphy, Eric Eskola and Cathy Wurzer.

Brian Ryks, director of the Duluth Airport Authority, was quoted by the News Tribune, saying, "When I met him at the front door of the terminal, he walked in and he said, 'Brian, we need a strong airport and the terminal is a big part of it and this is a good project.' "

The letter writer suggested Cravaack opposed building the new terminal, and the News Tribune didn't do its homework. Ryks' quote indicated the letter writer didn't do her homework.

In addition, in response to a statement from Cravaack that government doesn't create jobs, the letter writer asked, "What are police officer, firefighter, snowplow driver and other positions if not jobs created by government?" It's apparent the writer takes things too seriously. Hiring additional police officers, firefighters and snowplow drivers might be needed for various reasons but adding this additional staff won't add a point to a city's gross domestic product. The types of jobs Cravaack was talking about are jobs created by entrepreneurs. Projects like PolyMet create high-paying jobs. Increased mining operations mean increased port activity and significant job growth in that sector of the economy. Private-sector hiring introduces a new dynamism to the economy, one that feeds off itself. That's something public-sector hiring can't do.

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Duluth must ask whether it prefers a dynamic economy that thrives on Minnesota's entrepreneurial ingenuity or one that relies on the fed's largess. To me, that's an easy choice.

Gary Gross

St. Cloud, Minn.

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