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Our view: Maybe if she were a bigger baseball fan

In addition to being an "unsession," the upcoming assembly of the Minnesota Legislature is to result in a bonding bill that'll fund about $1 billion in projects across the state deemed to be of public value. This month, Gov. Mark Dayton released ...

NorShor Theatre
Duluth Mayor Don Ness laughs after the NorShor Theatre's marquee lights come on before he and developer George Sherman flipped the switch that was to signal the marquee's lighting in October. The lighting was part of an event celebrating the planned restoration of the building, which is on Gov. Mark Dayton's list for receiving state bonding money. (File / News Tribune)

In addition to being an "unsession," the upcoming assembly of the Minnesota Legislature is to result in a bonding bill that'll fund about

$1 billion in projects across the state deemed to be of public value. This month, Gov. Mark Dayton released a list of projects he supports funding. He included about $7 million for renovations to the NorShor Theater in Duluth's Old Downtown but rejected a request for about $5.5 million to renovate the historic but crumbling Wade Stadium. Who can forget the chunk of stadium wall that fell off last March? Thankfully, no one was hurt.

Meeting with Dayton on Friday, the News Tribune editorial board asked him about his decisions:

Why the NorShor? "(Lt. Gov.) Yvonne (Prettner Solon of Duluth) gets credit for that. That wasn't in my bill, I have to admit. I don't think it was even on the roster," he said. "But Yvonne came in, weighed in at the end there, and so I put it in. I just said, 'Yvonne wants it, so she gets it.' "

And why not Wade? The amount requested for Wade Stadium changed at least three times, the governor said, making him uneasy. "We had $3 billion of requests for a $1 billion (bonding) bill. Not everything worthwhile and needed was able to be included, (and) it just didn't seem like (the Wade project) was really locked down and ready to go," he said. "That was one of my principal criteria: I wanted things that were locked down and ready to go."

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Too bad for Wade supporters that Prettner Solon isn't more of a baseball fan.

Wade Stadium damage
Rob Hurd (left) and Brian Thorson, carpenters with the city of Duluth, inspect the bricks in the wall along first base at Wade Stadium in March 2013. A portion of the wall, seen as the "bite" along the top, collapsed the previous night. Stadium repairs and renovation did not make Gov. Mark Dayton's list for receiving state bonding money. (File / News Tribune)

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