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Reader's View: End shootings by not obsessing over them

The media need to report an incident, then provide a reference to get more information, and then forget about it.

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Regarding the frequency of mass shootings and the amount of news coverage each time, I have a suggestion that may help curtail or perhaps even put a halt to these unforgivable crimes: Stop talking about them.

Think about it. As the media depicts the sordid scenes, sympathizes with those affected, and sometimes dramatizes the incidents and suffering — and does this over and over — there may be unstable potential shooters out there who feed on the tragic coverage and in some twisted way imagine themselves as part of a similar act that serves some delusional thinking. To me, the script is there. It only needs to be acted out.

The media need to report an incident, then provide a reference to get more information, and then forget about it.

Gene Voelk

Foley, Alabama

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The writer is a native of Duluth.

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