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Reader's View: Care about what’s true by resisting blind faith

The second you have evidence of the claim, you are not blessed; it is not as good as blind faith, and don't trust your instincts that something may be off about the reasoning.

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The Bible’s book of Hebrews states, “Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.”

Proverbs reads, “Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding.”

In 2 Corinthians, it says, “For we walk by faith, not by sight.”

And in the gospel of John is this passage: “Because you have seen me, you believed; blessed are those who have not seen and yet have believed.”

What these scriptures are stating is that to have faith, without evidence, is a good thing. The second you have evidence of the claim, you are not blessed; it is not as good as blind faith, and don't trust your instincts that something may be off about the reasoning. It is reinforcing bad thinking, rejecting evidence (especially evidence to the contrary), and holding a belief with lack of evidence as a pinnacle of righteousness. It is a method to not demonstrate truth but to accept an assertion alone as truth.

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These verses are necessarily stifling curiosity, needing to know if they are true, because they assume truth without demonstration, using the flawed method of faith; they fortify faith by declaring it a divine method while shirking the responsibility of demonstration of that method by the method's very design.

If we care about what’s true, then investigating our own beliefs, regardless of conclusion, is necessary. If we don’t investigate our own beliefs, or lack of them, then we certainly don't care what’s true, only what feels good.

We should care about what is true, as believing true things allows us to make the best decisions based on the evidence. Is the milk spoiled? Do you smell it to make sure, or do you drink a tall glass weeks after the expiration date?

Adin Briggs

Duluth

The writer is founder of Twin Ports Humanists.

Related Topics: READERS VIEWRELIGIONFAITH
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