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Lakeside's revolutions

In 1955, after spending requisite time in the military and college, my new wife, Irene, and I looked for a new home for ourselves and future family. We found it in Lakeside with the additional guarantee that "nothing ever happens in Lakeside," an...

1297489+Paul John Lampi Sr.web_.jpg

In 1955, after spending requisite time in the military and college, my new wife, Irene, and I looked for a new home for ourselves and future family. We found it in Lakeside with the additional guarantee that "nothing ever happens in Lakeside," an assurance of tranquility and steadfastness. Our home overlooked the Portman Square field, which is now the Paul Modeen Field. With a view from our front picture window, I could see boys playing at various sports. Occasionally girls would show up, then disperse when boys came. It was the boys' world. Once a year a fire truck would show up and allow the boys to climb on the truck, ring the siren and spray the fire hose. One year a couple of girls showed up and the fireman coaxed them to participate. From that point on, equality with girl power was the norm, with parents and grandparents happily joining in. Revolution: You don't see it until it's there. Later, on another note, a new discord was brewing. It was discreetly understood that black people would not be allowed to move in as residents. When one black family, the Carters, did move in, extreme agitation on the part of certain elements erupted with arguments, petitions and ill-feeling. Adverse publicity curbed possible violence. Common sense, court rulings and, according to believers, the will of the Almighty prevailed and restored justice. The third revolution might yet be ongoing. On its merger with Duluth, Lakeside, under its anti-liquor original charter, was granted to be void of any liquor establishments. Movements to end this restriction have failed. The last election in 2008 failed by one vote. But even now change is creeping in, most amazingly through the golf course. (To help Lester Park Golf Course's financial situation, City Council voted to allow the clubhouse bar to serve alcoholic drinks stronger than 3.2 starting June 14.) A serene panorama might be evidenced when looking at still pictures of a glacier, but a raging torrent emerges when sequenced rapidly. That's Lakeside. Paul Lampi is a retired Denfeld history teacher.

Related Topics: HISTORY
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