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Can mining, BWCAW coexist?: Adjacent to Boundary Waters worst place for metals mining

[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"3225518","attributes":{"alt":"Becky Rom","class":"media-image","height":"480","title":"","typeof":"foaf:Image","width":"360"}}]]The life of our country presents pivotal moments when the American ...

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Denfeld’s 1947 boys basketball team is the only Denfeld basketball team to win a state title. The team’s head coach was Lloyd Holm. Team members were Rudy Monson, Larry Tessier, Paul Nace, Kenneth Sunnarborg, Eugene Norlander, Howard Tucker, Tony Skull, Jerry Walczak, Bruce Budge, Keith Stolen and student manager Bob Scott.


The life of our country presents pivotal moments when the American people can choose to go in one direction or another. For the iconic Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, we are at one of those moments. If we choose poorly, we will probably lose the Boundary Waters, the world's greatest canoe country wilderness. And when it is gone, it will be gone forever. For more than a century, Minnesotans from all walks of life and political persuasions have united to preserve and protect this magnificent place. In January the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service commenced a comprehensive two-year study to determine if Superior National Forest lands next to the Boundary Waters should be removed from the federal mining program to protect the wilderness from pollution and other environmental degradation caused by sulfide-ore mining. The study will consider a wide variety of factors, including scientific evidence, public input, economic considerations, ecological characteristics, and recreation value. SEE ALSO: Federal-withdrawal land-grab threatens jobs, our way of life The bureau and Forest Service have asked the American people for comments on the scope of the study. The public may submit comments until April 19. In addition, the Forest Service will hold a public meeting in Duluth today. I encourage every citizen who cares about our public lands to participate in decisions regarding the future of the Boundary Waters. The process the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management have begun provides an open, transparent, comprehensive, science-based method of reaching a decision - and it gives all citizens the opportunity to join a vital public discussion about how sulfide-ore copper mining might impact the Boundary Waters and their own lives. The Boundary Waters is the crown jewel of Minnesota. It is of incalculable intrinsic value to our state and a beloved part of our identity. The wilderness provides sustainable economic benefits not only because of recreation and tourism but also because people move to Arrowhead communities to be near the Boundary Waters. These people buy property, build businesses, and drive the local economies year-round. Millions of Americans treasure this vast watery landscape for fishing, hunting, canoeing, boating, camping, winter recreation, and more. The Boundary Waters is uniquely accessible because travel occurs mostly over water. At this moment, everything our state gains from the Boundary Waters also highlights everything we stand to lose if toxic pollution were to enter the wilderness. Independent, peer-reviewed scientific studies show that sulfide-ore mining on lands adjacent to rivers and lakes flowing into the Boundary Waters would pollute the wilderness, even under the ordinary operation of a modern, state-of-the-art facility. The water-intensive Boundary Waters and surrounding national forest lands in the wilderness watershed are about the worst places in the United States for sulfide-ore mining. Moreover, pollution from sulfide-ore mines threaten to flow into Voyageurs National Park and Ontario's Quetico Park, one of Canada's premier wilderness areas. The mining industry and its supporters have asked the administration of President Donald Trump to abruptly stop the review and open the public's lands next to the Boundary Waters to sulfide-ore copper mining, long recognized as America's most-toxic industry. Minnesotans don't want that. Statewide polling in February showed that 79 percent of Minnesotans (70 percent in the 8th Congressional District) support the current study, including majorities of Republicans, Democrats, and independents. Maintaining course on the current environmental review process is the best approach to allow for credible, well-reasoned, and well-informed federal decisions down the road, and it's the process the American people expect and deserve. Industry should not dictate the stewardship of taxpayer-owned public lands - especially a priceless wilderness area like the Boundary Waters.   Becky Rom of Ely is chairwoman of the Campaign to Save the Boundary Waters (savetheboundarywaters.org), a grassroots initiative led by Northeastern Minnesotans for Wilderness (nmw.org). HEARING TODAY; COMMENT TIL AUGUST   The issue At issue is a proposed 20-year withdrawal of federal minerals across 234,328 acres in the Superior National Forest within the Rainy River watershed. That means, potentially, no mining there and, more-specifically, no Twin Metals project near Ely. The U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management are accepting public comments through Aug. 17 to help inform the development of a draft environmental impact statement to study the proposed mineral withdrawal.   Public hearing today A public hearing is scheduled for 5-7:30 p.m. today in the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. An additional public hearing is being planned on the Iron Range, the Forest Service said.   Comment in writing Written comments may be submitted by mail to the Superior National Forest, ATT: Minerals Withdrawal, 8901 Grand Avenue Place, Duluth, MN 55808; by email to comments-eastern-superior@fs.fed.us; or by fax to (218) 626-4398.   More online A copy of the U.S. Forest Service’s Jan. 13 notice of intent in the federal register to prepare the environmental impact statement, the application, a map of the proposed withdrawal area, and guidance for commenting are at fs.usda.gov/superior.
The life of our country presents pivotal moments when the American people can choose to go in one direction or another. For the iconic Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, we are at one of those moments. If we choose poorly, we will probably lose the Boundary Waters, the world's greatest canoe country wilderness. And when it is gone, it will be gone forever.For more than a century, Minnesotans from all walks of life and political persuasions have united to preserve and protect this magnificent place.In January the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service commenced a comprehensive two-year study to determine if Superior National Forest lands next to the Boundary Waters should be removed from the federal mining program to protect the wilderness from pollution and other environmental degradation caused by sulfide-ore mining. The study will consider a wide variety of factors, including scientific evidence, public input, economic considerations, ecological characteristics, and recreation value.SEE ALSO: Federal-withdrawal land-grab threatens jobs, our way of lifeThe bureau and Forest Service have asked the American people for comments on the scope of the study. The public may submit comments until April 19. In addition, the Forest Service will hold a public meeting in Duluth today. I encourage every citizen who cares about our public lands to participate in decisions regarding the future of the Boundary Waters.The process the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management have begun provides an open, transparent, comprehensive, science-based method of reaching a decision - and it gives all citizens the opportunity to join a vital public discussion about how sulfide-ore copper mining might impact the Boundary Waters and their own lives.The Boundary Waters is the crown jewel of Minnesota. It is of incalculable intrinsic value to our state and a beloved part of our identity. The wilderness provides sustainable economic benefits not only because of recreation and tourism but also because people move to Arrowhead communities to be near the Boundary Waters. These people buy property, build businesses, and drive the local economies year-round. Millions of Americans treasure this vast watery landscape for fishing, hunting, canoeing, boating, camping, winter recreation, and more. The Boundary Waters is uniquely accessible because travel occurs mostly over water.At this moment, everything our state gains from the Boundary Waters also highlights everything we stand to lose if toxic pollution were to enter the wilderness. Independent, peer-reviewed scientific studies show that sulfide-ore mining on lands adjacent to rivers and lakes flowing into the Boundary Waters would pollute the wilderness, even under the ordinary operation of a modern, state-of-the-art facility. The water-intensive Boundary Waters and surrounding national forest lands in the wilderness watershed are about the worst places in the United States for sulfide-ore mining. Moreover, pollution from sulfide-ore mines threaten to flow into Voyageurs National Park and Ontario's Quetico Park, one of Canada's premier wilderness areas.The mining industry and its supporters have asked the administration of President Donald Trump to abruptly stop the review and open the public's lands next to the Boundary Waters to sulfide-ore copper mining, long recognized as America's most-toxic industry. Minnesotans don't want that. Statewide polling in February showed that 79 percent of Minnesotans (70 percent in the 8th Congressional District) support the current study, including majorities of Republicans, Democrats, and independents.Maintaining course on the current environmental review process is the best approach to allow for credible, well-reasoned, and well-informed federal decisions down the road, and it's the process the American people expect and deserve. Industry should not dictate the stewardship of taxpayer-owned public lands - especially a priceless wilderness area like the Boundary Waters. Becky Rom of Ely is chairwoman of the Campaign to Save the Boundary Waters (savetheboundarywaters.org), a grassroots initiative led by Northeastern Minnesotans for Wilderness (nmw.org).HEARING TODAY; COMMENT TIL AUGUST The issueAt issue is a proposed 20-year withdrawal of federal minerals across 234,328 acres in the Superior National Forest within the Rainy River watershed. That means, potentially, no mining there and, more-specifically, no Twin Metals project near Ely.The U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management are accepting public comments through Aug. 17 to help inform the development of a draft environmental impact statement to study the proposed mineral withdrawal. Public hearing todayA public hearing is scheduled for 5-7:30 p.m. today in the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. An additional public hearing is being planned on the Iron Range, the Forest Service said. Comment in writingWritten comments may be submitted by mail to the Superior National Forest, ATT: Minerals Withdrawal, 8901 Grand Avenue Place, Duluth, MN 55808; by email to comments-eastern-superior@fs.fed.us; or by fax to (218) 626-4398. More onlineA copy of the U.S. Forest Service’s Jan. 13 notice of intent in the federal register to prepare the environmental impact statement, the application, a map of the proposed withdrawal area, and guidance for commenting are at fs.usda.gov/superior.

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