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A blessing to live with an abundance of wildlife

The Oct. 19 article, "Partridge hunter enjoys a tradition of success," continues to dwell on my thoughts, and I am forever thankful that my state has produced the abundance of wildlife to help relieve the hunger of some deserving families.

The Oct. 19 article, "Partridge hunter enjoys a tradition of success," continues to dwell on my thoughts, and I am forever thankful that my state has produced the abundance of wildlife to help relieve the hunger of some deserving families.

I am in my 90s now and speak from experience, having lived through the Great Depression of the 1930s when wild game constituted a goodly part of our diet.

My father moved his family to Big Sandy Lake in McGregor in 1918. He found that he had more friends than he ever remembered, and in the following years he built cabins and boats to accommodate them. That was the start of our family resort. The fishing was great, the hunting good and the resort had a following of repeat customers.

One group from a southern border state puts me in mind of the 202 partridge reported in the News Tribune account. This group fished faithfully, daylight until dark, and shipped home a wooden crate (about half a bushel) of "dressed" fish, packed in sawdust and ice, each day of their week's stay. I know about this because I was 10 or 12 years old at the time and had to get the ice and sawdust out of the ice house for them.

At the end of their stay, when they were packed and paying their bill, Dad mentioned they had really done well on their fishing. The man paying the bill responded, "Oh, yes! But we would have done so much better had we come two or three weeks earlier!"

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Dad told this story for years. We had customers who just couldn't get enough, be it fish, ducks, deer or partridge!

Frank Wotring

Two Harbors

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