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St. Luke's gives away hearing aid batteries this week

Free batteries can be picked up through Friday at St. Luke's Ear, Nose and Throat Associates or any St. Luke's primary care clinic, while supplies last.

St. Luke's aerial photo
St. Luke's hospital in Duluth, pictured in July 2020.
Tyler Schank / File / Duluth News Tribune
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DULUTH — St. Luke's Ear, Nose and Throat Associates is giving away hearing aid batteries through Friday to raise awareness for Better Speech and Hearing Month.

Patients and community members are invited to ENT Associates, 920 E. First St., Suite 301, Duluth, or any St. Luke's primary care clinic this week to pick up the free batteries while supplies last, St. Luke's said in a news release.

To learn more about St. Luke’s audiology services, visit slhduluth.com/ENT .

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