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Minnesota reports 12 COVID-19 deaths Tuesday

Hospitalizations climb again, now number almost 750

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Photo: Unsplash/Fusion Medical Animation

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Following are the Minnesota Department of Health COVID-19 case rates, deaths, hospitalizations and vaccinations published Tuesday, Sept. 14. Because all data are preliminary, some numbers and totals may change from one day to the next.

Statewide case rates

  • NEW CASES: 4,603
  • SEVEN-DAY, ROLLING AVERAGE OF NEW CASES PER 100,000 PEOPLE: 27.7 (as of Sept. 6)

  • TOTAL CASES: 673,774
  • TOTAL RECOVERED: 652,675
  • SEVEN-DAY, ROLLING AVERAGE TEST POSITIVITY RATE: 7.1% (as of Sept. 6)

Hospitalizations, deaths

  • ACTIVE HOSPITALIZATIONS: 748 (as of Sept. 13)

  • TOTAL HOSPITALIZATIONS: 36,286

  • DEATHS, NEWLY REPORTED: 12

  • TOTAL DEATHS: 7,915

Vaccinations

  • FIRST DOSE ADMINISTERED: 3,359,990 people, or 72.6% of residents age 16 and older

  • COMPLETED SERIES (2 DOSES): 3,175,317 people, or 68.2% of residents age 16 and older

  • CHILDREN 12-15 WITH AT LEAST ONE VACCINE DOSE: 159,688

  • CHILDREN 12-15 WHO HAVE COMPLETED SERIES: 138,635

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