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Health Fusion: Chasing dinosaurs. Are we hardwired for interval training?

In this episode of the weekly version of NewsMD's podcast, "Health Fusion," Viv Williams talks with Dr. Michael Joyner about the benefits of interval training at any level. Joyner is a Mayo Clinic anesthesiologist, exercise physiologist, athlete and a world expert in interval training.

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In the world of exercise physiology. Dr. Michael Joyner is a giant. His vast amount of research in the area of human performance and endurance has benefited elite athletes, soldiers on the battlefield, patients having surgery and people trying to fit a little exercise into their days. In the '90s, he used scientific research to back up his theory that, eventually, someone would run a marathon in under two hours -- a feat accomplished in 2019 by Eliud Kipchoge . Joyner also leads the national convalescent plasma program for the treatment of COVID-19.

Joyner says interval training, also called high intensity interval training (HIIT), is a key to success in any type of exercise program. The idea of interval training is to alternate between short bursts of pushing hard and resting. Whether you're a beginner, a weekend warrior or elite athlete, working intervals into your exercise routine will improve your performance and your overall health.

But what if you're not into pushing yourself too hard during workouts? Joyner says it doesn't matter. He says any level of interval training will benefit your body. Plus, intervals are a quick and efficient way to fit exercise into a busy schedule. They are the basis behind the 11-minute workout that Joyner discusses in the podcast. Before you start any type of exercise program, including interval training, consult your health care provider to make sure it's safe for you to do.

Follow the Health Fusion podcast on Apple , Spotify , and Google Podcasts.

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Viv Williams

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