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Find out what being a victim of financial fraud or a scam could do to your blood pressure

When a scammer calls about your car's warranty or overdue taxes that must be paid immediately or you'll be hauled off to jail, do you get mad, scared or irritated? In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams checks out a new study that explores what being a victim of financial scams and fraud can do to your blood pressure.

Blood pressure measuring equipment ready for use
Regular blood pressure checks are important for heart health
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ROCHESTER — Financial schemes and scams may cause your blood pressure to rise. A new study from Rush University Medical Center in Chicago found that fraud victimization was linked to elevated blood pressure in men, but not in women.

The researchers followed 1,200 older adults annually for 11 years. They asked the participants about fraud victimization and they measured their blood pressure regularly. Results showed that after experiencing a financial fraud or scam, men's blood pressure reading went up. Over time, hikes in blood pressure could lead to health problems.

“These findings show that fraud victimization has important public health consequences and underscore the need for efforts to prevent exploitation,” said lead author Dr. Melissa Lamar.

High blood pressure (hypertension) increases your risk of diseases, such as heart attack and stroke.

The study is published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics society.

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For more stories about high blood pressure, check out the links below.

A quick power nap can boost energy and help you feel refreshed. But a new study links frequent napping to high blood pressure. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams shares that it's likely not be the naps themselves that are the issue, but rather the health and nighttime sleep patterns of the people who take them.
Smoking and high blood pressure can go hand-in-hand. Even if you're on medication to lower it. In this episode of NewsMD's "Health Fusion," Viv Williams explores a new study about how smoking may make high blood pressure harder to control.

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Follow the  Health Fusion podcast on  Apple,   Spotify and  Google podcasts. For comments or other podcast episode ideas, email Viv Williams at  vwilliams@newsmd.com. Or on Twitter/Instagram/FB @vivwilliamstv.

MORE HEALTH FUSION:
What are your favorite holiday foods? In this NewsMD column, a local chef demonstrates his mother's amazing Christmas lasagna. And Viv Williams explores how holiday food traditions can be good for your health.

Opinion by Viv Williams
Viv Williams hosts the NewsMD podcast and column, "Health Fusion." She is an Emmy (and other) award-winning health and medical reporter whose stories have run on TV, digital and newspaper outlets nationwide. Viv is passionate about boosting people's health and happiness by helping them access credible, reliable and research-based health information from top experts. She regularly interviews experts and patients from leading medical institutions, such as Mayo Clinic.
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