ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Wisconsin man calls cops on himself during armed robbery of liquor store

Suspect tells authorities he just snapped.

We are part of The Trust Project.

ELLSWORTH, Wis. — The Pierce County Sheriff’s Office responded to an armed robbery in progress at an Ellsworth liquor store midmorning on Saturday, Nov. 2. According to the complaint, the person who called police was the suspect himself.

Upon arrival at DS Liquor, officers made contact with a male holding a cellphone in his hand — later identified as Scott A. Neuman, 57, Ellsworth.

According to the complaint:

One employee reported that Neuman raised a knife in the air and was waving it around, saying that he was going to rob the store and told her to call the police. Before the employee could make the call, Neuman said he would call the police. While Neuman was on the phone with dispatch, the employee called another employee up from the back of the store. Neuman set the knife down when he went to make the call.

Neuman submitted a preliminary breath test but showed no signs of alcohol or drug impairment. When asked what happened, Neuman stated he woke up and thought he should go rob the liquor store. He reported that he just snapped, went to the kitchen and grabbed an approximately 12-inch long knife. Neuman stated he wanted to get thrown into jail.

ADVERTISEMENT

Neuman was released from jail on Nov. 4 on a signature bond. A pre-trial conference is scheduled for Dec. 17.

What to read next
A 46-year-old Cass Lake man has been charged with second-degree murder in connection with the July 2021 shooting death of Diego Gasca.
State, local agencies tab accessory dwelling units of 800 square feet or less as solution for homelessness.
The Cowbot would be a way to mow down thistles as a way to control the spread of weeds, "like a Roomba for a pasture," says Eric Buchanan, a renewable energy scientist at the West Central Research and Outreach Center in Morris, Minnesota.
The Red River Valley Water Supply Project will sue farmland owners for eminent domain if they don’t sign easements before July 8, 2022. Farmers say the project is paying one-tenth what others pay for far smaller oil, gas and water pipelines.