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Survivalist found in Quetico Provincial Park, area reopened

A shoeless U.S. citizen walking through Quetico Provincial Park in Ontario has been located and removed from the park, leading authorities to reopen closed areas of the border lakes region.

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A shoeless U.S. citizen walking through Quetico Provincial Park in Ontario has been located and removed from the park, leading authorities to reopen closed areas of the border lakes region.
The search had been underway since July 24 and had forced closure of several lakes in the remote park.
The man - Aaron Nathaniel King, 26, address unknown - had been described as both behaving unusually and as an “extreme survivalist” out testing his mettle.
His unusual presence - walking alone, with no provisions or shelter in an area where generally only canoeists travel - concerned Ontario park officials enough to close parts of the park where he had been seen until he could be located. The Ontario Provincial Police also asked for the public’s help in reporting his whereabouts.
He was eventually found, considerably north of the closed areas, and the park is now fully open, a Quetico park official said Monday.
“He was located and removed from the park by’’ police, said Jason Blier, Quetico Park assistant superintendent. “I’m not sure what they did with him after that.”
Ontario police officials were unavailable Monday, a national holiday in Canada.
A U.S. Forest Service official said King also had been seen on the Minnesota side of the border, the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, in recent weeks. King had been spotted by the public, who were concerned enough to report him to Forest Service personnel, but no Forest Service personnel ever caught up to him.
As was the case in Quetico, King did not have a BWCAW camping permit.
King had also been reported in Ely on several occasions this summer, according to the Ely Police Department which had been asked to check on his welfare. He apparently had been staying in and around Ely for several weeks.
King appears to have no criminal or civil court cases in Minnesota, records show. But he appears to have been arrested in Florida in 2010 where he was charged in Pinellas County with obstructing justice and being in disguise.
That arrest report listed Medford, Ore., as his hometown and that he had been born in North Carolina.
Ontario officials were calling King “a person of concern,’’ saying his behavior seemed more baffling than dangerous. He avoided days of efforts to track him down by both the Ontario Provincial Police and Quetico rangers.

John Myers reports on the outdoors, natural resources and the environment for the Duluth News Tribune. You can reach him at jmyers@duluthnews.com.
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