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Superior woman gets 10 years for retaliation attack in jail

A 23-year-old Superior woman serving time for her role in one of the biggest drug cases in Twin Ports history now has been convicted and sentenced for retaliating against another inmate for being a government witness.

A 23-year-old Superior woman serving time for her role in one of the biggest drug cases in Twin Ports history now has been convicted and sentenced for retaliating against another inmate for being a government witness.

Veronique Zsa zsa Antique Muckle was sentenced Tuesday in federal court in Minneapolis to 10 years, 1 month in prison. Muckle was indicted on Sept. 11, 2012, and convicted on April 12 of federal witness retaliation.

According to the indictment and evidence presented at trial, Muckle assaulted Angelique Michelle Vos last August, following Vos' return to the Sherburne County Jail after Vos testified as a government witness during the narcotics trial of Lawrence Lalone Colton.

Colton was on trial for his role in the drug-trafficking ring. At the time, Muckle and Vos were held separately in the Sherburne County Jail. Muckle was being held there awaiting placement in the federal prison system after being sentenced to four years, four months for her role in the drug ring.

When Vos returned from federal court on Aug. 14, Muckle ran from a segregated area of the jail and violently attacked Vos for testifying against Colton earlier that day.

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Colton, of Detroit, was convicted on three counts of distributing or aiding and abetting the distribution of oxymorphone.

Muckle, Vos and more than three dozen others pleaded guilty for their roles in a large-scale drug-trafficking organization that transported prescription pills and heroin from Detroit to the Twin Ports.

The organization was brought down after an investigation by the Lake Superior Drug and Gang Task Force; Duluth and Hermantown police departments; and the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

The investigation began in 2010 after local law enforcement noted an increase in Opana trafficking in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Opana is a prescription pain killer that contains oxymorphone, a controlled substance.

Law enforcement officers conducted dozens of controlled purchases of Opana and other drugs being sold illegally by ring members. As part of the investigation, authorities also executed search warrants on Sept. 27, 2011, at 11 properties throughout Minnesota and Wisconsin. In those searches, they seized large amounts of narcotics as well as firearms, ammunition and about $30,000 in cash.

The cases were prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Allen Slaughter.

Related Topics: CRIMESUPERIOR
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