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Strange bedfellows make for inspiring story at High Court

A week after the Supreme Court upheld the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act, sparking a new front in the abortion wars, Wisconsin Right to Life appeared before the nine justices in a different case, armed with a friend-of-the-court brief from ... th...

A week after the Supreme Court upheld the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act, sparking a new front in the abortion wars, Wisconsin Right to Life appeared before the nine justices in a different case, armed with a friend-of-the-court brief from ... the National Abortion Rights Action League's Pro-Choice Foundation?

Regular readers of this page won't find that shocking. As readers found out here in news articles and opinion pieces going back to February 2005, the issue the polar opposites are supporting is not common ground on abortion, but issue-oriented campaign ads that name elected officials while those officeholders are up for reelection, a violation of the McCain-Feingold Act. Joining the anti-abortion group are organizations as disparate as the American Civil Liberties Union, the AFL-CIO, the libertarian Institute for Justice and the NAACP.

Will the justices buy the groups' contention that letting public interest organizations mention the names of candidates during an election cycle is a matter of free speech?

Or will their adversaries at the Federal Election Commission prevail with the divergent view that it will open the floodgates to unfair, well-financed attack ads by shadow organizations?

Either way, there's already been a victory with the inspiring story of diametrically opposed entities fighting for common ground, especially in times as divisive as these.

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