Ellen Lesch (left) of Saxon, Wis. with Troop 323 and Trevor Lesch, 18, an Eagle Scout with Troop 323 assemble a bat house Saturday during a work day at the Boy Scouts of America Voyageur Area Council Service center in Hermantown. The completed houses are going to be installed in the Boulder and Island Lake areas north of Duluth.  (Clint Austin/caustin@duluthnews.com)
Ellen Lesch (left) of Saxon, Wis. with Troop 323 and Trevor Lesch, 18, an Eagle Scout with Troop 323 assemble a bat house Saturday during a work day at the Boy Scouts of America Voyageur Area Council Service center in Hermantown. The completed houses are going to be installed in the Boulder and Island Lake areas north of Duluth. (Clint Austin/caustin@duluthnews.com)

Wyatt Stauffenecker (from left), 15, of Hermantown a Star Scout with Troop 106 and Thea Stauffenecker of Hermantown work on tamarack spacers Saturday that are being used to create bat houses as executive director Michael Jenkins assembles a house at the Boy Scouts of America Voyageur Area Council Service center in Hermantown. The scouts are building the bat houses in conjunction with the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, Minnesota Power, Bat Conservation International and Norboard. (Clint Austin/caustin@duluthnews.com)
Wyatt Stauffenecker (from left), 15, of Hermantown a Star Scout with Troop 106 and Thea Stauffenecker of Hermantown work on tamarack spacers Saturday that are being used to create bat houses as executive director Michael Jenkins assembles a house at the Boy Scouts of America Voyageur Area Council Service center in Hermantown. The scouts are building the bat houses in conjunction with the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, Minnesota Power, Bat Conservation International and Norboard. (Clint Austin/caustin@duluthnews.com)

All finished bat houses will have this sign posted to them. The signs explain that even though habitat is not a factor in the decline of forest bats, the hope is that by increasing habitat will help bats survive despite the high mortality rate due to White-Nosed Syndrome. (Clint Austin/caustin@duluthnews.com)
All finished bat houses will have this sign posted to them. The signs explain that even though habitat is not a factor in the decline of forest bats, the hope is that by increasing habitat will help bats survive despite the high mortality rate due to White-Nosed Syndrome. (Clint Austin/caustin@duluthnews.com)

Bryce Hipp, 14, of Esko a Life Scout with Troop 152 uses a drill to predrill tamarack spacers Saturday that are being used to create bat houses at the Boy Scouts of America Voyageur Area Council Service center in Hermantown. The bat houses are created out of several layers of spaced wood on top of a 12-foot tall pole. (Clint Austin/caustin@duluthnews.com)
Bryce Hipp, 14, of Esko a Life Scout with Troop 152 uses a drill to predrill tamarack spacers Saturday that are being used to create bat houses at the Boy Scouts of America Voyageur Area Council Service center in Hermantown. The bat houses are created out of several layers of spaced wood on top of a 12-foot tall pole. (Clint Austin/caustin@duluthnews.com)

Saara Hipp (left) of Esko with Troop 152 and Alexander Leach of Duluth with Troop 15 move a completed bat house Saturday into the shade so they can apply a coat of stain. The bat house are built on a 16 foot long post and when installed, the posts will be buried three to four feet in the ground allowing the finished house to be about 12 feet in the air. (Clint Austin/caustin@duluthnews.com)
Saara Hipp (left) of Esko with Troop 152 and Alexander Leach of Duluth with Troop 15 move a completed bat house Saturday into the shade so they can apply a coat of stain. The bat house are built on a 16 foot long post and when installed, the posts will be buried three to four feet in the ground allowing the finished house to be about 12 feet in the air. (Clint Austin/caustin@duluthnews.com)