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Pollution Solution tour visits Duluth

As the sun broke out, the solar panels went to working powering a variety of devices designed to reduce the use of more traditional forms of energy. The National Environmental Trust's Pollution Solution Tour came to Miller Hill Mall on Monday wit...

As the sun broke out, the solar panels went to working powering a variety of devices designed to reduce the use of more traditional forms of energy.
The National Environmental Trust's Pollution Solution Tour came to Miller Hill Mall on Monday with its message of "cut energy bills and combat global warming."
The event included two energy efficient vehicles, a solar-powered trailer, numerous accessories, speakers and social overtones.
There was also plenty of information on global warming and numerous ways to reduce the use of fossil fuels.
Transportation was a big part of the show with a hybrid fuel efficient compact car, a truck that runs on natural gas or regular, electric bikes, a scooter and a 25-foot Airstream trailer.
The trailer is home to the four-member staff who use it to demonstrate new technology and depend on it for their comfort.
"We're hosting the tour to help educate the public and government about how to fight global warming and save money at the same time," said Rosie Loeffler-Kemp with Clean Water Action.
Dean Talbott, with Minnesota Power, described the Millennium Star, a super energy efficient home built by Minnesota Power in Piedmont Heights.
"We set about to include as many energy efficiency technologies as we could," he said. "Our target audience is really the consumer."
The innovations paid off, and the result is a 2,300-square-foot attractive dwelling that can be heated and cooled for about $280 a year.
The house depends largely on energy-conserving construction materials, special architectural features and solar power.
Other speakers talked about recycling, home energy use and global warming.
Ed Garvey represented "Save Our Unique Lands," a group opposed to the new power line proposed to start in Duluth and cross upper Wisconsin.
"We need to take a look at what's happening," said Frank Boyle, a Wisconsin legislator. "We have no snow. If I can sit on my deck in northern Wisconsin in February with a swimsuit on -- something is wrong."
He called the situation "frightening" and compared the energy industry to the tobacco industry's withholding health information.
Eric Howard, a tour staff member, said the trust wants to get the government to deal with global warming. It is advocating 10 measures, including support for a strong international agreement to combat global warming.
The trust is also promoting family efforts against global warming, and lists using fuel efficient cars as a top priority.

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