ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Our View: Our nonendorsement

With seven strong candidates running for mayor of Duluth, the question has been raised why the Budgeteer chose not to endorse candidates for the primary election on Tuesday.

With seven strong candidates running for mayor of Duluth, the question has been raised why the Budgeteer chose not to endorse candidates for the primary election on Tuesday.

First, the Budgeteer has no history of endorsing in primary elections. We haven't endorsed in primary elections in the past, and we saw no compelling reason to start now.

Second, and more importantly, a primary involves narrowing the field to two finalists for one seat. A dilemma exists here. Should we endorse the two candidates who most closely represent our belief of what Duluth needs in a mayor for the next four years? If we do that, we would endorse two candidates with similar philosophies. If they won, the general election would be little more than a personality contest, which would be a disservice to voters.

On the other hand, if we were to endorse, for example, a "liberal" and a "conservative" candidate, to create a sharp contrast in November, our endorsement would be inconsistent at best. One of our endorsees would be at odds with our philosophy on what qualities Duluth needs in its next mayor.

What might those qualites be? For starters, we think Duluth needs someone who can pull the community together. Second, we need someone who understands how jobs are created and how to expand the tax base. Third, we need someone who can attract talented department heads to City Hall who can stretch tax dollars.

ADVERTISEMENT

But the primary is mostly a personality contest. Once the field is narrowed, we'll offer our recommendation on who the next mayor should be.

What To Read Next
The system crashed earlier this month, grounding flights across the U.S.