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Our View:Detainees should be named

We don't mean to aid or abet terrorism anywhere in the world, and much of what the Bush Administration is doing in response to the events of Sept. 11 deserves support. However, the Justice Department has gone too far in detaining people by refusi...

We don't mean to aid or abet terrorism anywhere in the world, and much of what the Bush Administration is doing in response to the events of Sept. 11 deserves support. However, the Justice Department has gone too far in detaining people by refusing to disclose who is being held.
Twenty five years ago, an Argentine junta did the same thing. Dissidents disappeared off the streets, never to be seen again.
Were they murdered or merely imprisoned? Their families did not know and could not find out.
Attorney General John Ashcroft said earlier this week that if he released the names of the detainees, it would violate their privacy rights. They would be blacklisted.
Privacy rights aren't in the Constitution. What is in the Constitution is the right to a speedy and public trial.
It sets a dangerous precedent for government officials to arrest people without notifying the public. Being able to revoke people's liberty without public notice is a sure recipe for abuse.
Knowing who has been arrested tells no terrorist what the government knows, or in any way helps the terrorist commit another act.
The government should name all those it arrests.

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