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One step at a time

The Duluth Transit Authority has recently acquired 10 new 30-foot "low-floor" buses to replace 35-foot buses purchased in 1988. The new design of these buses has a lowered floor that allows the rider to take only one step in order to enter the ve...

The Duluth Transit Authority has recently acquired 10 new 30-foot "low-floor" buses to replace 35-foot buses purchased in 1988. The new design of these buses has a lowered floor that allows the rider to take only one step in order to enter the vehicle. This will make boarding easier and safer for many DTA riders. The new buses are built with state-of-the-art technology and are more fuel-efficient.

These new 30-foot buses, which have a seating capacity of 25, will be scheduled on neighborhood routes with lower ridership demands.

The new buses, which were manufactured by the Gillig Corporation of Hayward, Calif., are equipped with these additional passenger features: fuel efficient 6-cylinder, clean-burning diesel engine, rooftop exhaust stack for better disbursement of exhaust fumes, electronic transmission for smoother shifting and fuel efficiency, wider aisles for easy access to seats, hydraulic "kneeling" capabilities for easy boarding from an 11-inch step, heated boarding step to melt snow and ice for safer boarding, improved heating and air-conditioning for passenger comfort, padded vandal-resistant fabric passenger seats for comfortable seating, air-suspension for a comfortable ride, increased interior lighting, larger electronic destination signs for easier reading and special assistance features for disabled passengers.

Driver operational improvements include electronic remote controlled and heated side mirrors for easy adjustment and frost-free vision, improved seating for operator comfort, Improved heating and ventilation of the driver's compartment, mechanical brake retarder for smoother and safer braking, simplified wheelchair operation and a foot-controlled microphone switch.

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