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US first lady Jill Biden tests positive for COVID-19

Because President Biden is considered a close contact of the first lady according to CDC guidance, he will wear a mask for 10 days when indoors and when in close proximity to others.

U.S. President Joe Biden arrives at the White House in Washington following a visit to eastern Kentucky
U.S. President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden arrive at the White House following a trip to flood ravaged eastern Kentucky on Aug. 8. On Tuesday, Aug. 16, officials announced Jill Biden tested positive for COVID-19.
Evelyn Hockstein / Reuters
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WASHINGTON -- U.S. first lady Jill Biden tested positive for COVID-19 after developing cold-like symptoms late on Monday evening, her communications director Elizabeth Alexander said on Tuesday.

After testing negative earlier on Monday as part of her regular testing cadence, a later PCR test taken after she developed symptoms came back positive, the spokeswoman said.

President Joe Biden tested negative for COVID-19 on Tuesday on an antigen test, White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said on Twitter.

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Because President Biden is considered a close contact of the first lady according to CDC guidance, he will wear a mask for 10 days when indoors and when in close proximity to others, Jean-Pierre said.

"We will also increase the President's testing cadence and report those results," she said.

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Jill Biden is experiencing mild symptoms and has been prescribed a course of Paxlovid, Alexander said.

The first lady is currently in South Carolina where the Bidens have been on vacation. She will return home after she receives two consecutive negative COVID tests, Alexander said.

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This story was written by one of our partner news agencies. Forum Communications Company uses content from agencies such as Reuters, Kaiser Health News, Tribune News Service and others to provide a wider range of news to our readers. Learn more about the news services FCC uses here.

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