ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Front-line workers can start applying for $750 hero paychecks next month

Roughly 667,000 Minnesotans could receive the checks if they apply. And the state expected to start sending them out beginning in September.

030621.N.DNT.SacrificesC1.jpg
St. Luke’s Emergency Department Registered Nurse Josh Solberg disinfects a workstation in the monoclonal antibody clinic where patients with COVID-19 are treated. He recently spoke about what it’s been like being on the frontlines of the battle against the pandemic. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)
We are part of The Trust Project.

ST. PAUL — Minnesota front-line workers can start applying for hero pay checks from the state starting next month, the Department of Labor and Industry said this week.

The department on Tuesday, May 24, said it would open the application portal beginning June 8 and would leave it open through July 22. Eligible front-line workers could then expect to see their checks sent beginning September 5, according to the department.

Lawmakers approved and the governor signed into law a $500 million plan to send funds out to those who remained on the job in person during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The proposal also repaid the federal government for a loan to the state's unemployment insurance fund and replenished that fund, a move that will refund higher tax rates to employers.

Under the law, roughly 667,000 front-line workers could stand to see $750 bonus checks. Eligible employees would include health care workers, teachers, meatpackers, corrections officers, first responders, grocery store workers and several others.

ADVERTISEMENT

Eligible employees would have had to work 120 hours between March 15, 2020, and June 30, 2021, and not have drawn down unemployment benefits for more than 20 weeks.

There would also be an income cap of $85,000 for individual filers who did not work directly with COVID-19 patients to be eligible. Those who worked with COVID-19 patients could receive the checks if they make $175,000 or less a year.

Department leaders urged workers to sign up for news about the application process at frontlinepay.mn.gov.

MORE FROM DANA FERGUSON:
Several incumbent state legislators, particularly in the Senate, edged out competitors with more extreme views on COVID-19, election security and more.

Follow Dana Ferguson on Twitter  @bydanaferguson , call 651-290-0707 or email  dferguson@forumcomm.com.

Dana Ferguson is a Minnesota Capitol Correspondent for Forum News Service. Ferguson has covered state government and political stories since she joined the news service in 2018, reporting on the state's response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the divided Statehouse and the 2020 election.
What to read next
“History has this sort of really funny way of recycling,” Pao Houa Her says. “Hmong people are given these lands that are deemed uninhabitable, and they’re having to make do with what they have.”
Primary elections typically have a significantly lower turnout than the November general election. Minnesota has had nation-leading voter turnout in its last three general elections, reaching nearly 80% in 2020.
“The idea of being able to vote for yourself as the first trans person you've ever seen on the ballot is, I mean, it's special,” Finke said. “We're around and we deserve representation"
Correctional officers of color said in a lawsuit that they “were segregated and prevented from doing their jobs … solely because of the color of their skin” when former Minneapolis officer Derek Chauvin was booked into the Ramsey County jail in St. Paul for the killing of George Floyd in May 2020.