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Minnesota woman gets 120 days in jail for outburst at Superior police

A Minnesota woman who spent hours spitting, thrashing and screaming a stream of obscenities at Superior police officers during her arrest was sentenced to 120 days in jail Monday in Douglas County Circuit Court.

A Minnesota woman who spent hours spitting, thrashing and screaming a stream of obscenities at Superior police officers during her arrest was sentenced to 120 days in jail Monday in Douglas County Circuit Court.

Ashla Marie Ojibway, 21, pleaded guilty Monday to resisting an officer, operating a motor vehicle without the owner's consent, attempted battery of a police officer and driving while intoxicated. Additional charges of battery of a peace officer, hit and run, disorderly conduct and obstructing an officer were dismissed.

Judge George Glonek sentenced her to two years probation with 120 days in jail. Huber work release was granted. Other conditions of her probation include paying $3,000 restitution for damage done to two vehicles, paying court costs and a $10 fine for each count. She also was ordered to undergo a chemical dependency evaluation.

Ojibway fought with police for hours after allegedly stealing a truck and damaging another on Dec. 7. Five officers were called to help transport her from the Superior Housing Authority building to the hospital. They used a spit hood, handcuffs and hobbles for her legs. Eventually, officers carried her out to the squad car.

At the hospital, Ojibway "was still wildly out of control," according to a report by Officer Chris Moe. She continued to struggle and tried to kick nursing staff. Officers handcuffed Ojibway to the bed and she had to be held down during the exam.

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Ojibway spat in the face of one officer and bit his shoulder.

In reporting the incident, Moe wrote, "To prevent being repetitive, her violent, vulgar and uncontrollable behavior continued for the approximate 60 minutes we were in the hospital."

Test results show Ojibway had a blood-alcohol concentration of 0.24 percent, three times the legal limit to drive.

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