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Minnesota man charged with shooting, killing 700-pound black bear on Red Lake Indian Reservation

The Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians does not permit non-Indians to hunt bear, a clan animal, within the boundaries of the Red Lake Indian Reservation, due to the bear’s spiritual importance to the band.

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Brett Stimac poses with a bear he shot in September 2019 in a photo widely circulated on social media. (Facebook / Cuyuna Lakes Community Watch)
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BRAINERD, Minn. -- A Minnesota man has been charged with misdemeanor wildlife trafficking and trespassing on Indian lands after shooting and killing a bear on the Red Lake Indian Reservation, U.S. Attorney Erica H. MacDonald, announced Friday, Dec. 6.

Brett James Stimac, 40, of Brainerd, will make his initial appearance before Magistrate Judge Leo I. Brisbois in U.S. District Court at a later date.

According to the allegations, on the evening of Sept. 1, Stimac, who is not an enrolled member of the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, willfully, knowingly and without authorization or permission, entered the Red Lake Indian Reservation for the purposes of hunting a bear. Using a compound bow, Stimac shot and killed a large American black bear near the reservation’s garbage dump.

According to the allegations in the information, on Sept. 2, Stimac posed for photographs with the bear’s carcass and later shared the photographs on Facebook. Because of the bear’s large size, Stimac was unable to move the bear from the reservation, and instead removed the bear’s head and paws and harvested a small portion of the meat. Stimac left the remainder of the carcass on the reservation.

The Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians does not permit non-Indians to hunt bear, a clan animal, within the boundaries of the Red Lake Indian Reservation, due to the bear’s spiritual importance to the band.

Related Topics: CRIME AND COURTSBRAINERD
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