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McDonald's retaining wall collapses

A portion of the parking lot is closed, but the restaurant and drive-thru remain open.

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Crews close off part of the parking lot at McDonald's at London Road and 21st Avenue East on Tuesday evening after a retaining wall facing London Road collapsed. (Tyler Schank / tschank@duluthnews.com)
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The retaining wall in front of the McDonald's on London Road and 21st Avenue East collapsed Tuesday, forcing the closure of part of the parking lot.

City of Duluth spokesperson Kate Van Daele said McDonald's contacted the wall's contractor, who cleared debris from streets and closed off a portion of the parting lot nearest the collapse.

A city of Duluth building official will visit the site on Wednesday "to further evaluate the situation," Van Daele said.

No one was injured in the collapse, Van Daele said.

When reached by phone, a McDonald's manager said the restaurant and its drive-thru remained open Tuesday afternoon but said she was not allowed to comment on the collapse.

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