ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Look out for vampire fans tonight at premiere of "Twilight"

There will be people milling outside of local movie theaters late tonight. Likely, they will be women in their teens and early 20s with a renewed interest in a particular vampire. And, like Dead Heads and Trekkies and other super fans before them...

Stars of 'Twilight' in NYC
Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson, of the new movie "Twilight," appear on the NBC "Today" television program in New York, Thursday Nov. 20, 2008. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

There will be people milling outside of local movie theaters late tonight.

Likely, they will be women in their teens and early 20s with a renewed interest in a particular vampire. And, like Dead Heads and Trekkies and other super fans before them, they have a name: They're Twi-hards.

Friday is the national release of the movie "Twilight," based on the first of a four-book young adult series written by Stephanie Meyer. Three local theaters, Duluth 10, Lakes 10 and Premiere Theatres, are offering midnight screenings, although by Wednesday afternoon Duluth 10's three late shows were sold out and Lakes 10 was getting close to capacity. The theater in Cloquet, which seats 207, still had tickets available -- but hadn't decided on a midnight show until Tuesday.

The film stars Kristen Stewart as Bella Swan, a clumsy new-girl-in-school who piques the romantic interest of the mysterious and good-looking Edward Cullen, played by Robert Pattinson. This is not your ordinary love: Edward is a vampire who has sworn off eating humans, but, boy, does Bella smell good. The story follows the doomed couple as they first ward off their impulses, then ward off a pack of vampires without Edward's moral code.

While Bella Swan is a normal high school girl whose foibles, bruising and bumbling resonate with young women, it is Edward Cullen who has Twi-hards in a tizzy.

ADVERTISEMENT

"He has bronze-colored hair," said Sarah Eliason, a senior fan from Duluth East who will be at tonight's late show wearing a "Twilight" T-shirt from Hot Topic's extensive collection of "Twilight"-themed paraphernalia.

"His eyes change color from light brown to black," Eliason said. "If he's pretty full, his eyes are really light brown, golden. If he's hungry, they're black. He has pale skin that sparkles in the sun. He's toned, but not buff. ... Sorry, I get carried away. He has a strong jawbone, and a lopsided smile. Really long eyelashes."

Eliason, who has been following the production of the film from when it was still in negotiations, feels the most connection with the character Alice, a fashion-conscious and outgoing vampire. She says the greatest moment of the "Twilight" series occurs on Page 460 in the third book, "Eclipse." But she won't say more than that. Eliason did not want to reveal a spoiler.

Eliason turned her mother Deb on to the series.

"Sure enough, it sucked me in," Deb Eliason said. "The author did a great job with important themes: family, she does a good job with good and evil, she does a good job with loyalty. ... What I did tell [Sarah] is that you will never find a boy like Edward Cullen. He's a superhero."

"Once you hear Edward Cullen, or hear him described, no human man will ever look that good again," said Keely Taylor, a freshman at the University of Minnesota Duluth. "He's the best fictional character since Mr. Darcy."

Taylor began reading "Twilight" at Barnes & Noble in the spring. She found a comfortable chair and kept reading. Seven hours later, Taylor had gone cover to cover and now an image of Pattinson is her screensaver.

"They're such visual books," Taylor said. "It doesn't seem like text on paper. [Meyer's] writing style is so overwritten, lush and vivid. It's very sensory."

Related Topics: MOVIES
Christa Lawler is a former reporter for the Duluth News Tribune.
What To Read Next
The system crashed earlier this month, grounding flights across the U.S.