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Medved to step down from Duluth City Council

Fellow councilors will be tasked with appointing his replacement.

Derek Medved
At large Duluth City Councilor Derek Medved will step down in February to tend to the growth of his business, including the Korner Store convenience store in Gary pictured here in 2019.
Steve Kuchera / File / News Tribune
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DULUTH — At large City Councilor Derek Medved announced Thursday night his intentions to relinquish his office on Valentine’s Day, Feb. 14.

In a 10:25 p.m. email to Council President Arik Forsman, Medved wrote: “With new business endeavors on the horizon, I do not feel I can both manage my business enterprise and provide the level of public service my constituents deserve.”

Medved went on to say: “It has been my honor to serve the citizens of the city of Duluth for the past two years.”

He did not return voicemail messages Friday morning from the News Tribune.

The City Council is expected to appoint someone else to serve out the remainder of Medved’s term , which ends in 2024. Forsman anticipates the council will likely seek applicants for the post and will conduct interviews before selecting Medved’s replacement.

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Medved owns and operates a small chain of local gas station/convenience stores.

Forsman said Medved called him Thursday night, before sending a follow-up email.

“He recently announced a business deal that will continue his growth as an entrepreneur. So, I’m very happy for him that he continues to have success in the business world,” Forsman said. “It’s very tough to see a colleague go. But I support his choice and wish him nothing but the best.”

Forsman said Medved brought useful life experience to his office .

“He did have a unique perspective on the council that will be hard to replace, as a long-time West Duluthian who owned a business and was also a younger entrepreneur. So, that will be something to keep in mind as the council decides how we go about finding someone who has some of those skill sets potentially,” Forsman said.

Peter Passi covers city government for the Duluth News Tribune. He joined the paper in April 2000, initially as a business reporter but has worked a number of beats through the years.
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