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Duluth’s Grassy Point rec area temporarily closed

Duluth's natural-surface trails are also closed until drier conditions arrive

hiking boots
Hiking and other activities at the Grassy Point Recreation Area in western Duluth will be off limits as restoration work resume there, likely into July.
Bob King / File / Duluth News Tribune
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DULUTH — The city's Parks and Recreation Division has closed the Grassy Point Recreation Area and trail system in preparation for site improvements that will be underway into July.

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and the Minnesota Land Trust are completing a habitat restoration project as part of the larger cleanup and rehabilitation of the St. Louis River Estuary. It's the last work on a multi-year, $18 million project.

The primary objectives for the Grassy Point area is to restore and enhance native forest and wetlands and control populations of exotic invasive plant species. The project also includes improved trails in the area.

The Grassy Point parking area will be closed sporadically for staging and construction access. The recreation area and trails will remain closed for the project's duration. The project is expected to be complete by July.

Unpaved city trails closed until dry

Meanwhile all unpaved, natural surface Duluth city trails are now closed until further notice. The trails are subject to wet, muddy conditions in spring and use now could cause damage. The city invites walkers, bikers and others to use paved and gravel trail systems such as the Lakewalk, Old Hartley Road, the Waabizheshikana trail (formerly the Western Waterfront trail) and the Willard Munger State Trail.

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