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Duluth Public Schools assistant superintendent finalist for Detroit-area job

Anthony Bonds is one of five superintendent applicants at Ferndale Public Schools scheduled to interview later this week.

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Anthony Bonds
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DULUTH — A high-level school administrator is on a shortlist of people who could head a Michigan school district.

Anthony Bonds, Duluth Public Schools’ assistant superintendent of teaching, learning and equity, is one of five applicants Ferndale Public Schools board members selected on Saturday to interview for an open superintendent position. Those interviews are scheduled for Friday and Saturday at the district’s high school media center. It’s unclear on which of the two days Bonds’ interview is scheduled.

Bonds on Monday declined the News Tribune's request for comment.

About 3,000 students are enrolled in Ferndale’s seven schools in suburban Detroit, according to the federal National Center for Education Statistics . Duluth Public Schools, by comparison, has about 8,300 students enrolled in 17 schools.

Duluth School Board members hired Bonds in July 2020 from the Anniston City School District in Alabama, where he was the executive director of curriculum and instruction. In April 2021, Bonds was one of seven people selected to interview for the then-open superintendent job at Robbinsdale Area Schools in Hennepin County, but did not advance to the list of finalists.

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Joe Bowen is an award-winning reporter at the Duluth News Tribune. He covers schools and education across the Northland.

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